Community advisors play key role in residence life

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Living in residence plays a large part in shaping a student's university experience. That's why the role of community advisors is important to the residence system.


[img_inline align=”right” src=”http://padnws01.mcmaster.ca/images/kendrawacaseyl08.jpg” caption=”Lawrence Lam, house programming advisor and Kendra Wacasey, house community advisor stand outside Les Prince Hall where both work as Residence Life staff. Photo courtesy of Lisa Lewkowicz.”]Living in residence plays a large part in shaping a student's university experience. That's why the role of community advisors is important to the residence system.

A position held by undergraduate students, a community advisor lives in residence and helps to develop a community that is supportive of the academic and personal goals of students. A community advisor is a role model to students, encourages participation in residence activities and ensures that residence policy is followed.

Kendra Wacasey, a third year Arts & Science student, is currently in her second year as a community advisor.

“I liked that my community advisor was always available and encouraging me to get involved in residence opportunities,” says Wacasey of her decision to apply for the position. “She really helped me feel at home in residence and I wanted to provide that same experience for other students.”

On top of developing meaningful relationships with other students, Wacasey's role provides an opportunity for personal growth.

“I have gained many new skills from working in this position, with the most important skills being leadership, time management and interpersonal skills. In this job you are a leader. Students look up to you and you interact with a wide variety of people each day. You learn to communicate effectively, which is going to be an advantage to any future career.”

Being a community advisor is a paid, live-in position. Community advisors are responsible for organizing programs that give students a chance to socialize and to meet people, to have new experiences, and to learn new skills.

Applications are now being accepted for the 2009 to 2010 academic year. No experience is needed to apply.

Applicants must attend a mandatory information session in the Council Chambers, Gilmour Hall, room 111 on Friday, January 9 from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. Applications must be submitted online at www.macrls.com and are being accepted until Wednesday, January 14. Questions can be directed by email to applyrls@mcmaster.ca.